Tag Archives: media lab

Color certain part of the photo

Want to make your photo fancier? Here is a little useful trick

This is the original image:

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If we want to color only the flower and make the rest black and white, it will look like this:

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Open the image and select ‘Pen Tool’ from the tool barImage, the select ‘Path’ from the function window at the topImage, and draw along the figure of flower like this

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press ‘CTRL+ENTER’ to select the area you just drew, and then press ‘CTRL+SHIFT+I’ to select the counterpart

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Duplicate the background layer to get background layer copy, then select ‘<Image –> Adjustments –> Hue/Saturation>, a window will pop up and enter the data like following

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Now your image will look like this:

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You are done for now, but if you want to further change the color of the flower, do the following:

press ‘CTRL+SHIFT+I’ to counter-select the flower part, and get the window for ‘Hue/Saturation’ again( A fast way to do this is to press ‘CTRL+U’)

If I want the flower in bright color, I will enter the data as following

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Notice the color of flower changed? Press ‘CTRL+D’ to cancel selection, and you are done!

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Making mirrored image

We also see fancy cosmetics commercials like this:

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Using photoshop makes the product looks more presentable, and you may find the trick is very useful in photo-processing. Wonder it is done? Here is the simple tutorial:

First, we need to set up the background, click ‘File –> New’, in the window popped up, entry the data

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Note the entry could be different depends on what size and background color you want, for the example above, we get a image like this:

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Open the target image, select ‘Magic Wand Tool’Image, click at the background , press ‘CTRL+SHIFT+I’ to select the counterpart

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Drag the selected image to the background image

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Use the same method to get the bottle image

 

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Now we want to make the mirrored images, selected ‘Layer 1’ and ‘Layer 2’ and duplicate them, and we get ‘Layer 1 copy’ and ‘Layer 2 copy’

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Select these 2 copies of layers and press ‘CTRL + T’ to transform them,  right click on the image and select ‘Flip Vertical’, we get the image like this

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Adjust the opacity of this two copies of layer to 40%

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and we get the result image, YEAH~

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Photoshop Healing tools

Have you ever taken a really nice picture, only to discover in post processing that there were some dust specks on the lens? Or maybe there’s a whole object you’d like to be somewhere else. Whatever your issue, the quickest way of fixing is probably the Healing tool, instead of manually doing it with the brush tools. 

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Take this picture for example. Beautiful sky. Real nice. But, there’s some grey-ish specks all over the place. And a creepy looking Spongebob smiley face. 

In Photoshop, on the left vertical tool box menu, you will see a symbol of a bandaid. If you click the bandaid, a menu box will appear, with your options: the spot healing tool, the healing brush, the patch tool, the content aware move tool, and the red eye tool. In this tutorial I will be showing you how to use the Spot healing brush tool and the Content aware move tool. The latter is a new option for CS6 and it’s totally cool. 

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Using the Spot Healing Brush Tool is very easy. All you do is select the tool, and paint over the area you want to fix. Make sure the brush size is a little larger than the area you want to fix, but not too much. 

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Repeat this step for all the spots you have in your picture!

Content aware move tool comes in handy when you have something that you really want to be situated somewhere else in the photo. This is best achieved if the object you’re moving can suffer a bit of distortion (which tends to happen with the Content aware move tool.) and if you’re moving it to a similar background. 

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Let’s look at creepy Spongebob again. To move him around, all you have to do is select the Content aware move tool and start drawing your selection around him. As with the spot healing tool, make sure to leave yourself a little bit of a margin for easier blending. 

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Click it and drag it to wherever you want it to be positioned now.

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As you can see, the blending isn’t totally perfect and there’s distortion on the object. You can further fix the blending with the spot healing tool if you want. Again, this move tool is best used for things that can handle a bit of distortion. However, it’s a pretty neat tool to have when you think about the fact that before you had to use a whole lot of tools to get a similar result. Now it’s as easy as draw, drag and voila!

I hope you learned a new thing today and have fun using the Healing tools!

Introduction to Layer masks in Photoshop CS6

As a Photoshop user, and even as a straight-up beginner, you’ll probably come across a time where you need to manipulate an image, working with transparency but not removing the pixels. If you’ve been too scared to work with Layer Masks before thinking they were too tricky, well, they really aren’t! What you need to know is the difference between black and white.

What Layer Masks do is they control the transparency of an image. But you might say that you can already do that by using the Opacity option on the selected layer. Well yeah, but that only lets you increase or decrease transparency of the entire layer. What if you want to have just one part fade out and into a gradient for example? Or what if you want to blend two images together without an awkward line in the middle?

First, let’s open two images in PS.Image

After opening the images, they will be in separate windows. We will need them in the same window.

In order to bring one in the same window as the other, select the Move Tool, and simply drag one over the other.

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Both images are in the same window. As you can see, the second one is on a different layer, on top of the first.

(You may need to adjust the background layer so that they don’t overlap too much. In order to make adjustments to the Background layer, it must first be unlocked. In order to do that, it has to be made into a layer. Simply double click the Background layer tab.)

Now that you have both images in the same window, you might think that you could just use the Eraser tool on a very soft setting in order to delete the line merging them together. Well, you could, but what if you later decide that you want to show more of the image? The only way to go back from here is to do it all over again, and that’s too tedious. Instead, let’s use a Layer Mask.

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To create a Layer Mask, select the layer you want to apply the mask to (in this case, I selected the top layer), and click on the Layer Mask button. You won’t see any changes to your image, but instead you will see a layer mask thumbnail attached to your layer. You will see that it is filled in white. This is because in Layer Masks, white is transparent, black is opaque and grey controls the transparency levels.

In order to merge the two pictures together, we won’t be using the Eraser Tool, but the Paintbrush tool! Simply select your paintbrush tool, and set the foreground color to Black (remember, this will hide the pixels you don’t want showing). Make sure you have your Layer Mask thumbnail selected (not just the layer! You’ll only end up with a black streak on your picture), and paint over the area you want to hide!

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As you can see, the Layer Mask isn’t fully white anymore. That’s because you’ve hidden some pixels. If you want to show more of the image, you can just go over it with white instead.

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After messing around with it a bit more, this was the finished result. Probably not the best stock images to use, but you get the idea!

I hope you’ve learned something new today and have fun using non-destructive Layer Masks!

Welcome

The Mount Holyoke College Media Lab is an interdisciplinary space for technology exploration. Students from across campus come together here to study and work on creative projects in new media.

Inspired by similar endeavors and by a post on temporary architecture, we decided to create a “pop up” Media Lab on a shoestring budget. The adaptive reuse of the old slide library was such a success that in 2012 the Media Lab was made permanent.

Today the Media Lab hosts classes on digital art and architecture, student group meetings, research instruction sessions, and more. Students can use the large format printers, scanners, vinyl cutter, copy stand, video conversion deck, and film splicing equipment at all hours through keycard access.

The Lab is staffed by 8-10 students from diverse backgrounds and majors, including Art, Computer Science, Physics, Architecture, and Neuroscience. Supervised by a LITS Liaison, these students maintain the lab, assist other students, and participate in projects to explore uses of new technologies for teaching and learning.

The purpose of this blog is to share the results of some of these technology explorations, and to build a body of knowledge around low-cost, low-threshold tools for teaching and working with cutting-edge technology.

We hope you’ll join us!